Posts Tagged ‘arts’

Never Again exhibition @ the Cartoon Museum

June 19, 2014

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Bailey’s Stardust Exhibition @ National Portrait Gallery

June 7, 2014

800x442_BS1536LS                                                     Jerry Hall and Helmut Newton, Cannes by David Bailey, 1983

Arcade Fire @ Earl’s Court

June 6, 2014

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Plato’s Symposium @ Queen Elizabeth Hall

May 31, 2014

What is Love?  An eternal question and quest…

Modern adaptation by James Runchie brought Love and Eros at Southbank Centre.

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Flash Mobs @ Peacock Theatre

May 27, 2014

ImageDance and Spirit (more…)

Manet @RAA

April 7, 2013

Last chance to visit Manet: Portraying Life at Royal Academy of Arts!

The truth is that our only obligation should be to distil what we can from our epoch, through without belittling what earlier periods have achieved. (Eduard Manet, 1878-79)

BAL8147

more theatre to come

April 7, 2013

Ready to welcome the spring after a long winter…..with some thespian experience:

Black Swan

January 30, 2011

I watched the Black Swan yesterday and I really enjoyed Aronofsky’s direction as well as Portman’s great performance. I understand  though some ballet critics and dancers who claim that we need to see Natali Portman as an actress and not as a ballet dancer. What attracted my interest was the interplay between the  eternal duality: the good and the bad, the white and black, the total absence of any in-between state. The roles of Odette and Odile (the white and black swans in the Swan Lake) reflect the great differences between Me and me, where me becomes the antithesis of Me. The eternal struggle between the good self and the bad self that leads inevitably to an endless imperfect effort for perfection.

Thinking or Doing?

January 29, 2011

Gideon Rachman asks in the FT of 25th January: ‘Where have all the thinkers gone?’

He is making an interesting discovery on the basis of this year’s list of the Foreign Policy magazine re the ‘Top 100 Global Thinkers‘  (of 2010).

He notices that the top ten in the list are quite more famous as doers (rather than thinkers).

‘…The 1861 rankings could have startd with Charles Darwin and John Stuart Mill….then you could include Karl Marx and Charles Dickens. And that was just the people living in and around London. In Russia, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky were both at work, although neither had yet published their greatest novels….’

After naming a few reasons that may account for the above difference between the thinkers of the past century and the doers of our days he concludes:

‘ ….there is a final possibility. That, for all its wealth and its gadgets, our generation is not quite as smart as it thinks it is’.

 

Probably Gideon Rachman is right. Probably we are less smart despite the tools we use to ‘make’ us smarter (i.e. smartphones?). Or, it is probably our epoch that requires us doing rather than thinking. If thinking is not reflected upon doing then what difference can it make? And, I believe, ‘doing’ has a taste, while ‘thinking’ may be just a nostalgia of a possible ‘doing’…..

 

Gauguin @ Tate Modern

November 29, 2010

I recommend Gauguin: Maker of Myth at Tate Modern Gallery to those ones who can enjoy and exhibition without questioning its feminist boundaries. For me Gauguin represents not only the movement to Primitivism but a deeper political break-up with the modern life, the Western culture and the conventional post-colonian pragmatism. Gauguin knows how to transform the ‘different’ into ‘exotic’, the ‘other’ into part of ‘us’, the ‘local’ into ‘global’.

One of my favourite paintings by him:

Two Tahitian Women